Archive for October, 2016

FOG

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016

 

little-girl-holding-halloween-candle-holder-picjumbo-com

 

Time and again, particularly in growth businesses, I see leaders proudly trumpeting their unplanned but hugely gratifying successes that they have achieved. When I ask about what decisions they will make today about planned future growth, their default is to say that we are in “pause mode”, and recall past stories of investing too early in entirely different businesses, at entirely different stages of growth. “I know it sounds silly, we know that we need to invest first and then enjoy the returns but we are not in that mindset, at present.”

The effects are the “stop-start” impact of growth on the top and bottom line. Sales pipelines that are at one moment overflowing and another running dry, revenues that have a strong couple of quarters followed by leaner quarters and increased volatility in profits. The volatility creates a sense of unease in management’s own thinking and often investor unease in management’s ability to achieve their projected profitable growth targets, as originally agreed. Confidence is a fragile vase, once shattered hard to put back again.

We all know that we must grow our businesses but coming to terms with the consequences of growth is seismic for some entrepreneurs and executives. From an investor’s perspective, management’s fear of growth (“FOG“), is as debilitating a condition for an organisation’s future as the actual consequences of the growth investments made. The consequences of investing too late or not at all, are rarely even considered after the event by management (the great business development hire you never made, the business you could have acquired, the market opportunity you could have secured and so on).

Understanding what are the causes of “FOG”, are fundamental to growing a thriving business. Why is it that management are unable to take prudent risk? Why cannot they put in place appropriate preventative and contingent actions? Why have they stopped trusting their own judgement?

The answers give you a more profound understanding of the management team, the beliefs that govern their actions and the results that in all probability will arise for investors.

There are, of course, rational consolidation moments in periods of high growth, to ensure growth is manageable and healthy or when there are dramatic macro environmental changes taking place in a designated market. What I am suggesting entrepreneurs and executives think about is the irrational moments, management’s self-inflicted fear of growth and the consequences for their key constituents. Are they afraid of the dark or the “monsters” that may appear in the dark?

© James Berkeley 2016. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

James Berkeley to Speak to Stanford Continuing Studies Start-Up Class On Uncommon Early-Stage Capital Raising Approaches

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

 

scs_logo_cymk_lg

 

Berkeley to Discuss Strategy and Tactics for Global Entrepreneurs  

London, England— 19th October, 2016

James Berkeley, Managing Director of ELLICE CONSULTING LIMITED will be speaking to  the Fall 2016 class, “How to Build Successful Startups,” about how to get investors eager to meet you, the behaviours that turn them off and why “CASH”, a concept developed by Berkeley, is the quickest route to obtaining committed capital. The online Zoom session is scheduled for Thursday, 20th October, 2016 and is being co-hosted by Continuing Studies Program instructor John Kelley.

“I am constantly amazed by what I didn’t know two months ago. In bringing hundreds of investors and entrepreneurs together from around the world to address complex and ambiguous growth investments, continuing education is arguably the most under-valued aspect of the entrepreneurial journey. We invest blood sweat and tears in our business ideas and ask investors to validate their judgement by deploying scarce capital, yet as entrepreneurs we are often remiss in investing appropriately in our own skills, expertise and behavioural traits”, notes Berkeley, an expert in sourcing and deploying capital in world-class businesses. “The future for entrepreneurs is about “CASH”. Compulsive content, abundant credibility, striking rapport with investors and huge cash-on-cash returns. The good news, it has never been easier for entrepreneurs to stand out from the crowd so long as they are willing to engage with investors beyond the obvious steps.” Berkeley will help participants to translate his success practices into practical action for immediate application in their own businesses.

James Berkeley brings entrepreneurs and investors, who never imagined collaborating together to turn a business concept into an organisational reality. Today: an idea. Tomorrow: committed capital. He has worked extensively with North American, European, Middle Eastern and Asian venture capital funds, corporate venture capital, Family Offices and HNW entrepreneurs seeking proprietary deal flow and strategic deployment of capital into remarkable business ideas. He has helped over 120 investors and entrepreneurs in insurance, financial services, leisure, business services and technology source capital and accomplish record amounts of value creation in the past 5 years with impressive cash-on-cash returns.

Interview With Me: Risks Of International Expansion

Monday, October 17th, 2016

In an interview with ChronicleLive reporter Mark Lane, James explains why the risks of expansion are often overlooked as investors and management jump on the bandwagon of international growth, often with disastrous results.

Export Strategies Can Make or Break An Organisation 

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/business/business-news/first-steps-ladder-success-international-11970237 

Acending To The Top Step

Monday, October 17th, 2016

 

gray-concrete-stairs-picjumbo-com

 

Why do so many people consciously ignore the biggest risk to getting the business or opportunity, the absence of a peer-level trusting relationship with the individual(s), whose power and influence can scupper their ability to meet their client’s objectives? If the risk is obvious, why don’t they address it BEFORE they bid for the business or seek the opportunity. Do we have an attitude deficit (we are not a peer of those people or our immediate mid-level buyer won’t let us near them) or a skills deficit (intellectual firepower, use of language, comfort in a corporate strategic discussion and so forth)?

My experience is that the procrastination says more about how the individual views themselves (self-worth, value, scarcity) and less about the reality of the situation that they are faced with. If you are not willing to invest the time, skills and resources to address the risk (establish a peer-level trusting relationship) in advance, you are probably not “worthy” of the business or opportunity in future. Harsh but true?

© James Berkeley 2016. All Rights Reserved.