Trusting Your Fundraising Technique

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The crucible of the Olympics separates those, who implicitly trust their technique honed over early mornings and thousands of hours of practice and those, who fear the headlines that will be writ large about their despair. The “mental toughness” commentators talk about is really a mindset issue. A “fear of failure” cripples talent. A “no fear” mindset allows talent to flow.

Owners and top managers in growth businesses don’t have to wait four years for their golden opportunity. Rarely is your failure final, nor are you likely to be written off publicly.

Why cannot you walk into that investor meeting knowing you have tremendous value to bring and do your absolute best without fear? Why cannot you exude implicit confidence in your recommendations and demonstrate absolute credibility? If you knew you couldn’t fail what would you say to the current or prospective investor and how would you direct the conversation to convert the opportunity?

Many entrepreneurs and executives tell me hundreds of reasons why the investor passed on the opportunity. Most have reasonable language techniques but they don’t trust themselves in the moment. They freeze, their mind becomes scrambled and they default to “selling” (proving their worth) rather providing value (showing their worth) to the other party. When their conversation is subordinated to a sales pitch, which is quickly rejected, it is game over.

Believe in your skills and expertise implicitly and maintain a mindset that failure is temporary at worst. Your audience want you to succeed. They are investing 60 minutes of time because they believe it will be time well spent building a formal or informal relationship with you.

© James Berkeley 2016. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

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