The Entrepreneur’s Uncommon Legacy

90% of entrepreneurs want to leave a powerful and lasting legacy upon the successful transition of their business, yet most fail. I define “legacy”, in a business context, as a framework within which decisions are made today about sustaining the beliefs that will enable the business to thrive in the future.

Failure is not in my experience down to the most obvious reason (renouncing control) rather it is the absence of people, long before the sale of the business is concluded, with the skills and volition to implement the entrepreneur’s desired legacy in the real world, and constant procrastination. Here is a simple checklist for the Entrepreneur:

  1. What would a successful legacy look, feel, touch, smell, taste like to those who are important to you and in what realistic timeframe?
  2. Whose support must you command upfront (exemplars, key influencers) to sustain it?
  3. What specific goals are you trying to accomplish internally and externally (e.g. improve succession planning, more impressive innovation, heighten customer awareness of societal issues etc.)?
  4. What elements need tackling first (e.g. strengthen career development, prioritise resource to performance improvements not fixing problems, identify exemplars etc.)?
  5. What must be done tomorrow and the day after?
  6. By whom and by what deadline?
  7. Do it.

If you need additional expertise, hire it. One of the biggest mistakes is the assumption that the content knowledge your coterie of existing advisers and top managers have about the inner workings of the business is sufficient to succeed. Here is the litmus test for the Entrepreneur:

  1. Do my key people possess a high, moderate or low level of familiarity with my legacy?
  2. Do my key people possess a high, moderate or low level of clarity about my legacy?
  3. Do my key people possess a high, moderate or low level of skills to implement my legacy?

Better to have started early, tried and failed than for the entrepreneur to look back with regrets about the mistakes that were made by not being bold enough or making it your priority, before the business was sold.

© James Berkeley 2017.

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