Posts Tagged ‘clients’

Bring Something Meaningful

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

 

I get approached at a minimum, by 3 people a week proposing some form of “collaboration”. Most commonly, other advisers, entrepreneurs, co-investors and bankers trying to access my investor or client communities and their capital, people or innovation. In most cases, they are decent people with a genuine request, who have been a success in their corporate careers. In their latest entrepreneurial incarnation, they have “capped” out their personal networks and/or they are unable to accomplish their goals without external assistance. Their “well” is running dry and they want me to share my water. They are largely offering symbolic (greater presence or a share of faux-success fees), not meaningful value (a powerful brand or actual cash).

I am a huge believer in collaboration as a powerful form of leverage. However, first, it needs to pass my litmus test:

  1. Combined, there is a scarcity and dramatically enhanced value that will significantly impact the speed and quality of my client acquisition prospects.
  2. There is an attractive short-term business opportunity of mutual interest (potential client, visible need with a strong fit and ease of implementation).
  3. I can and definitely want to help after considering prudent risk and potential reward.

I’d suggest I am not alone if you think about the quantum of conceptual collaborative discussions that you are presented with. Do you possess these simple questions, to reach a fast conclusion or do you allow multiple meetings and information exchanges to follow before reaching a conclusion?

Above all, is the other party bringing something meaningful? Yes or No.

Nothing more is required.

© James Berkeley 2017. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

Who Transforms The Transformer

Monday, July 18th, 2016

Large advisory firms (Big Four and large management consulting practices) have cornered an expertise in transforming how large businesses deploy capital, manage human resources and IT, accelerate innovation and implement strategy. Yet many of those same “expert” firms are desperately in need of transformation.

How else do you explain the increasing tension between the commodity end of their work (outsourced shared service offerings) and the desire to grow the high-margin, high-value strategic advisory business? It is a fraying piece of string for those, who desire to play in both segments.

The complexity of the advisory businesses is such that an increasing proportion of front line employees time is being reserved for internal issues (tweaking matrix organisation structures, new value propositions, problem solving and fees), at the expense of the client. Yet there are very few people in those firms, who have the skills and volition to want to lead the change (“champion”).

Safety lies in the belief that your brand will get you the first meeting with the large client. Yet a cursory google search reveals very few Partners in these firms, who are demonstrably centres of expertise or objects of strong interest to C-level operatives and the wider global media. Inherently, the transformation business is a pricing battle dressed up in pseudo value-based fees.

Indeed, changing the operating beliefs that inform the behaviour of Partners and Directors in those firms is very hard. The outliers or mavericks in those firms are tolerated to the extent that they inject some colour into client relationships but they are very rarely embraced in the inner sanctum. So you end up with external market forces largely determining the future of these advisory firms.

A client wouldn’t take advice from Hilary Clinton on email etiquette or Donald Trump on diplomatic communication, why would they hire these folks? The only conclusion is that they feel safe in hiring lots of extra pairs of hands from a known brand so long as the price is right.

You’ll have a hard time convincing me that is right for the client and the advisory firm’s future.

© James Berkeley 2016. All Rights Reserved.