Posts Tagged ‘gambling’

Problem Gambling Addicts

Wednesday, December 12th, 2018

A number of well-meaning individuals, who have suffered the consequences of gambling addiction in the UK have made it their mission in life to educate others about the risks of gambling. Here is the irony, in arriving to solve the problem, they end up becoming the problem.

They routinely confuse their unfortunate “past” with the requisite skills, behaviours and expertise to productively educate others about a healthy coexistence with gambling. A legal enterprise and form of entertainment for millions that is not disappearing anytime soon. They view themselves as “better” qualified to help. They enlist political support and disproportionate media coverage because they see themselves as “victims” (of avaricious gambling companies) and the media are only too ready to help them tell their story. Their tales are powerful images of lives destroyed fuelled by low self-esteem, talent and judgement. Yet rarely do you see them taking individual accountability.

When they are offered the chance to collaborate with other “experts”, who have successfully drawn a livelihood from sports betting, they find it “contradictory”. It is hard not to conclude that their new found self-confidence has stepped over into arrogance.  Their policy (blanket bans) and educational approaches (prevention) are not a common sense solution to the real world problems that we face in today’s society. 

Let’s be clear the proliferation of fixed odds betting terminals in UK betting shops, and adverts that promote bets the punter cannot win long-term on (Skybet, Bet 365) and delusionary levels of self-esteem have no place. Beyond that there is an urgent need for people with a depth and breadth of knowledge and unbiased views about sports betting (rarely problem gamblers) to inform impressionable youngsters. 

Are You Thinking What I Was Thinking

Friday, February 17th, 2017
  • In all the nonsense about fake news, are we really saying the audience is permanently stuck second-guessing themselves or the decisions that they are making are not our preferred ones? (Brexit, Trump etc.)
  • Is there anything more unappealing than awards events, where people who have been successful in a singular profession and insulate themselves from the real world are suddenly “experts” on geopolitics, leadership, social issues and so on?
  • No one knows what the Trump presidency will have in store for us but the sun will rise and set each day, businesses around the world will trade with each other and culturally diverse communities will continue to interact. Perspective is more important than ever.
  • Watching the first 10 minutes of Bridget Jones’s Baby is a reminder that gratuitous use of swear words, displays a startling lack of intellect and a sign in neon lights to “move on”. The shame is the movie ending is worth watching but I wonder how many people stuck around.
  • Why do celebrities post naked or near-naked pictures of themselves on their social media accounts? If their objective is to protect their privacy, aren’t they throwing fuel on a fire that they have limited prospect of controlling?
  • Why are we “shocked” when a politician (Andy Puzder), a celebrity (David Beckham) or a business executive’s (Vice-Chair of Samsung) leaked private messages doesn’t caste them in a flattering light? They are normal human beings with the very same weaknesses and insecurities, prone to making dumb decisions.
  • The word “great” in business, science, sport, culture and so forth is so abused when describing individual performance that moments like Tom Brady’s Superbowl climax quickly become yesterday’s news.
  • If Americans needed reminding of why infrastructure spending is a priority take a walk through JFK, LAX or Miami airport and compare the experience with that in London Heathrow, Schipol, Dubai, Hong Kong or Shanghai.
  • Do CEO’s shop their own business on a sufficiently regular basis? Here in the UK, the major banks’ knee-jerk response to internet banking has been to slash the number of branches and make it exponentially more time-consuming for their customers to perform routine tasks (cashing a cheque). It is hard to see how that is in the customers best interest?
  • There is another high street presence, which is on a “life support machine” as societal mores change and the internet disrupts the sector. Thousands of bookies or sports betting shops solely exist on high-stakes fixed odds betting terminals preying on the most vulnerable members of society. In a town of 40,000 people there might be 3 or 4, thirty years ago, today in a deprived square mile of an inner city, there is probably 25 shops.

© James Berkeley 2017. All Rights Reserved.