Posts Tagged ‘investing’

Seed-Stage Investing: Time, Not Money

Monday, April 16th, 2018

If we don’t value our time, why should others? I have spent a good chunk of the past 3 years, inundated by entrepreneurs largely seeking help accessing global pools of predominantly private capital, at the seed stage. A timely blogpost yesterday by the insightful venture capitalist Fred Wilson reaffirmed a point that I have been reminding hundreds of individuals – “what is the return on your time invested, not your money”?

Here is what I see:

  • The Poverty Entrepreneur“: A majority of individuals, who have been a success in their “past” but they don’t act like a success today (forever claiming poverty, reluctant to hire external expertise on equitable terms, seeking endless “free” favours without regard to others’ time). Often relics of large management consultants or banking.
  • “The Abundant Entrepreneur”: the rare, hidden gem, more often than not a seasoned entrepreneur, who is respectful of others’ time, willing to pay equitably for high quality advice and has a high level of self-worth.
  • The Acquiescent Board Chair“: the well-known business person, who dabbles in young businesses either for affiliation needs with other impressive figures or the rare chance of a jackpot outcome. Very much a discretionary investment of their time, they are prone to ask apologetically for extended favours (contingent fee basis) from advisers, knowing in all probability it is a low return on everyone’s time invested but we are all in the “hope factory” together.
  • “The Scrambling Adviser”: A cohort of financial and corporate advisors (often solo and boutiques), who this IS their prime source of wealth. They are invariably failing to balance time invested, a sustainable business and a career successfully.  Few survive for long without exploring alternatives.
  • “The Luxury Adviser”: A cohort of financial and corporate advisors, whose principle source of wealth (founding business, a banking career etc.) affords them the luxury of dabbling as advisors and investors in the seed area without regard to the actual return on their time invested.
  • “The Blunt Investor”: A cohort of professional investors, whose prime source of wealth arises from seed stage investing, time is precious and they are wont to give very blunt responses to requests for their time or flatly ignore them.
  • The Luxury Investor“: A cohort of angel and high net worth individuals, whose prior success affords them the luxury of significant discretionary time. Driven by their intellectual curiosity and wealth (time and resources), they are more relaxed about time given to seed investments (an interesting alternative to “pro bono” advice and charitable giving).
  • The Tax Investor“: A cohort of angel and high net worth individuals, whose tax structuring particularly in the UK attracts them to seed investing. They are cogniscent of time in so much as it enables them to understand the net financial consequences of seed investments.

You undoubtedly recognise some of these individuals if you have got this far, perhaps yourself. I am not here to tell you what you should do but I am here to urge you to apply critical thinking, and to ask, “is this a great way to surrender my scarce time, not just my money?”

© James Berkeley 2018. All Rights Reserved.

 

James Berkeley to Speak to Stanford Continuing Studies Start-Up Class On Uncommon Early-Stage Capital Raising Approaches

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

 

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Berkeley to Discuss Strategy and Tactics for Global Entrepreneurs  

London, England— 19th October, 2016

James Berkeley, Managing Director of ELLICE CONSULTING LIMITED will be speaking to  the Fall 2016 class, “How to Build Successful Startups,” about how to get investors eager to meet you, the behaviours that turn them off and why “CASH”, a concept developed by Berkeley, is the quickest route to obtaining committed capital. The online Zoom session is scheduled for Thursday, 20th October, 2016 and is being co-hosted by Continuing Studies Program instructor John Kelley.

“I am constantly amazed by what I didn’t know two months ago. In bringing hundreds of investors and entrepreneurs together from around the world to address complex and ambiguous growth investments, continuing education is arguably the most under-valued aspect of the entrepreneurial journey. We invest blood sweat and tears in our business ideas and ask investors to validate their judgement by deploying scarce capital, yet as entrepreneurs we are often remiss in investing appropriately in our own skills, expertise and behavioural traits”, notes Berkeley, an expert in sourcing and deploying capital in world-class businesses. “The future for entrepreneurs is about “CASH”. Compulsive content, abundant credibility, striking rapport with investors and huge cash-on-cash returns. The good news, it has never been easier for entrepreneurs to stand out from the crowd so long as they are willing to engage with investors beyond the obvious steps.” Berkeley will help participants to translate his success practices into practical action for immediate application in their own businesses.

James Berkeley brings entrepreneurs and investors, who never imagined collaborating together to turn a business concept into an organisational reality. Today: an idea. Tomorrow: committed capital. He has worked extensively with North American, European, Middle Eastern and Asian venture capital funds, corporate venture capital, Family Offices and HNW entrepreneurs seeking proprietary deal flow and strategic deployment of capital into remarkable business ideas. He has helped over 120 investors and entrepreneurs in insurance, financial services, leisure, business services and technology source capital and accomplish record amounts of value creation in the past 5 years with impressive cash-on-cash returns.

The Insurance Corporate Venturing Pulse

Monday, July 18th, 2016

When you introduce two good friends that you know from two completely different walks of life, there is that pregnant pause in which both seek to find a common connection and language to build a relationship. To the introducer, it seems perverse that there would be a delay, you know both people intimately and you have thought long and hard before introducing them. So I liken the insurtech corporate venturing world today.

Inherently it makes sense that entrepreneurial tech businesses have the capability to transform venerable insurance businesses. In most cases there are shared values and a receptiveness to make a relationship work. Yet there is an uncertainty born of speaking different “languages” and the reality that operates in their respective sectors (resisting and embracing change, regulation, corporate bureaucracy and inertia).

Having assisted a number of businesses on both sides of the table, here is my current take:

  1. The quantum of insurance tech money will double in the next 24 months. There will be a greater concentration of capital in the hands of a smaller number of powerful brands (VCs, CVCs and UHNWs), who are able to raise capital faster.
  2. You will rarely hear about the failed insurtech investments but be certain 80% of the so-called strategic investments will never be strategic, in that those technologies are successfully adopted into the insurance corporate venturing unit’s mothership.
  3. Only 50% of an insurance corporate venturing unit’s invested companies today will be their best corporate investments next year in view of internal and external changes.
  4.  A more formal insurtech investment ecosystem will arise with greater concentration in a smaller number of hubs (Silicon Valley, New York, London, Singapore) that foster innovative environments. If you are not “present” locally, as a service provider, you will not be in the game.
  5.  Speed will be as, if not more important a factor than the quality of the capital, for entrepreneurs in the best insurtech opportunities. Bad news, for insurance corporate venturing unitss with long decision-chains or timelines.
  6. Insurance corporate venturing units that create a powerful gravity to their brand will triumph over those who are largely reliant on opportunistic investment ideas landing in their “inbox”. Heightened importance of peer referrals, networking, publishing, speaking, writing and so forth.
  7. With increasing numbers of people in the insurtech ecosystem, there will be a filtering out of people (entrepreneurs, investors and others) who are truly centres of expertise and objects of interest. Having your CEO make blow-hard statements about his visit to Google, facilitating an insurance disruption event or thinking that merely pushing out generic position papers on your own or a third party’s platform will get you there, is a fool’s paradise.
  8. Tech entrepreneurs that live at 35,000 feet and are beholden to the future without regards to the health of today’s insurance industry, today’s realities of marketing an early stage business and today’s decision-making are living in cloud cuckoo land.

Copyright James Berkeley 2016. All Rights Reserved.