Posts Tagged ‘networking’

Exclusive Invite: Private Equity International’s Operating Partners Forum

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

Intrigued by what a private equity operating partner does, the value they create and the critical issues (digital, strategic, operational) in European private equity now and the next 12 months? Here is an exclusive invitation.

I am back for a third year moderating a panel session (3/4 May, 2017 IOD London) with a great cast that includes a former CEO of one of Europe’s top-ranked private equity firms, a Cambridge-educated Austrian doing great work in infrastructure investing and an Italian transforming the fortunes of a German Family Office. If you have an iota of interest in value creation, join me at Europe’s pre-eminent event featuring 70+ operating partners and 30+ limited partners in intimate surroundings.

http://www.cvent.com/events/operating-partners-forum-europe-2017/event-summary-c2532f5d6ccc4666acd807e72568cbf0.aspx

Here is a deal, sign up using this code and receive a 15% discount off the registration fee (OPspeaker17) PLUS for the first six subscribers I am buying breakfast on Day 2. There are currently 4 seats remaining.

There is no other such gathering for the remainder of the year. If you are unable to make it but interested in receiving a quick “free” checklist of the key takeaways, drop me a note to james@elliceconsulting.com. I’ll make sure that you are on the distribution list.

© James Berkeley 2017. All Rights Reserved.

Flourishing Business Networks

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Would you say that your personal and professional network is sufficiently diverse for the level of growth your firm anticipates in the next 12, 24, 36 months?

If YES, how can you best leverage your network to be even more valuable to your firm’s growth plans and your personal success?

If NO, where must you start to transform your network(s) to be more relevant and valuable to your colleagues, clients, shareholders and business partners?

My observation is that in the first third of our careers, we are largely growing and refining our networks. In the second third of our career, our networks atrophy into three groups.

(1) Some people we know well who remain highly relevant to our future.

(2) Some people we know well who could remain highly relevant but first, we must consciously and willingly adapt our relationship and how we interact.

(3) Some people we know well who are no longer relevant to our future (retired, past offerings, past expertise, past function).

A great many people will change their frequency of contact with people they know well by accident or circumstance. A minority actually make it a priority to do so. So that in the final third of their career, many people struggle to reinvent themselves and their value to others because their network is largely made up of people, who are no longer highly relevant to their firm’s future.

Rather like roses in the garden, if our future is to be appealing, the seeds of valuable present and future relationships need to planted and watered well (reciprocal help and value offered). Some relationships will bloom every year and others just once or twice before they die. Each Winter, the dead rose plants need to be removed, the flowerbeds weeded and the soil nurtured for the existing roses to bloom again next Summer. Further, there needs to be a commitment to reinvest in new roses each Spring such that every year we add greater variety, colour and freshness.

Is your garden (network) sufficiently seductive for those you wish to attract (ideal buyers, peers, shareholders, business partners) to convince them to spend time in your company (meet) and immerse themselves in your attractive offerings (buy your products, services and relationships)?

© James Berkeley 2015. All Rights Reserved.

Global Gaming and Lotteries To Twist

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Here is a few reflections from the largest global casino, lottery, mobile and social gaming event, ICE Totally Gaming 2015, held in London this week:

  • With regulation on a par to the nuclear and energy sectors, can investors really be sure that the valuations for most gaming businesses today have adequately priced changes in regulatory risk?
  • Industry faces unparalleled level of intrusion. In the next 5 years a prominent gaming or lottery business will be a target of cyber terrorism from those whose values conflict with gaming and lottery operators.
  • When the overt marketing message is pushing girls in skimpy outfits with bad fake tans rather like a tired 197os porn film, does it really create a seductive rapport to your brand and its’ products and services or signal that your business has runs out of new ideas and excitement?
  • The sector doesn’t lack for people with abundant enthusiasm but it does lack abundant leadership prowess. Crossing that divide arguably biggest challenge.
  • When the immersive mobile and social gaming experience is so life-like why get on a plane or train to travel to Las Vegas or a London casino with the added cost of rooms, food and beverage and transport?
  • The future of gaming and lotteries is either (1)  a fully immersive gaming offering or (2) fully immersive gamification
  • Expect a significant rise in strategic collaboration, particularly additional services added to the lottery’s offerings
  • “Live” gaming experiences (casinos, sports betting, and so on) will close in even bigger numbers this year, when the consumer can find more excitement and value at home or in other pursuits.
  • The failure of major casino, sports betting and lottery operators to embrace innovation within their business will preface exponential growth in reactive/defensive investment in early-stage growth business this year.
  • Technology vendors in the sector face an increasing gulf between the “have’s” (knowledge, capital and scale) and the “have nots” predicating increased merger and acquisition activity in 2015. (IGT-GTech, Amaya and Scientific Games just the start).
  • Government agencies that are tethered to outdated legislation (Canada, US, Europe) are accelerating the irrelevance of regulated gaming and lottery products as the market diverges with changing customer preferences, demographics and so on. Expect greater friction and legal disputes in the next 12 months.
  • With few barriers to entry, the sector doesn’t lack for entrepreneurs wanting to create and build businesses but how many really “cash out” with a meaningful cheque? Expert a rise in incubators, accelerators and corporate venturing in the next 12-24 months.
  • While ICE like G2E has positioned itself as a “go to” trade show event, the learning opportunities (seminars and conferences) and the value derived from them are still no greater than 4/10. Organisers, sponsors and participants have a lot of work to do to attract a more impressive crowd. Expect the smarter exhibitors to fill this thought leadership “gap” in the next 12-24 months.

© James Berkeley 2014. All Rights Reserved.