Posts Tagged ‘productive time’

Truly Connected

Tuesday, November 21st, 2017

Why does the size of a great many people’s personal networks (number of LinkedIn connections, Instagram followers etc.) say more about their own self-worth than the value they actually confer? If the objective is to build and cultivate an increasing number of peer-level trusting relationships and offer people of interest impressive value that cannot be done anonymously in cyberspace.

I recall an experience with a London-based recruiter keen to impress me with his Global Private Banking and UHNW wealth management connections and return a favour. “If you’d like my help, have a look at my LinkedIn connections and let me know, who I can introduce you to.” After reluctantly following his approach and mentioning three names, he immediately responded, “Sorry they don’t know me well or they’ll confuse you with my candidate work.” We settled on another one at his suggestion, a rather prickly character, running a private investment office with a venerable European family background. “Go and see him, I’m sure it will be a valuable use of your time”.

Five minutes into the meeting, it was abundantly clear that the investor had close to zero relationship with the executive search partner and that in offering the introduction, the recruiter was clueless about the investor’s needs. Indeed, I’d hazard a guess that of the recruiter’s 2000+ LinkedIn connections, perhaps only 15 know him well and he has a contemporary understanding of their needs.

This isn’t exclusive to the executive search sector. I have had recent examples with highly successful Board Chairs, private equity partners, bankers and corporate executives, who are conciously obsessing about the size of their networks, largely for their own ego trip. However when you press hard or follow through, you find 80% of the people in their network, really don’t know them that well, today, or at all.

Don’t assume someone is “truly connected”, however impressive their “past” or the size of their network. Ask for recent examples of highly similar introductions and the results that arose. Listen, do your own homework and make your own judgement.

© James Berkeley 2017. All Rights Reserved.