Posts Tagged ‘Results’

We Have All The Time In The World

Thursday, February 22nd, 2018


Louis Armstrong made a wonderful record and a great refrain, do you have “time enough for life to unfold?” All of us do in reality unless we are suffering a severe illness or injury, yet a great many smart people structure it disastrously or use it woefully. Just today, the Harvard-educated US hospitality executive, whose calendar works in 15 minute increments, lo and behold by 7:30am shows up 25 minutes late, full of apologies and we achieve close to zero. The European fintech entrepreneur, who insists on taking “urgent” calls when we meet, describes himself “crazy busy” and turns a focused 45 minute capital raising conversation into a rambling 90 minute dialogue of half finished ideas and no clear, next steps. Even my public-funded doctor’s surgery doesn’t schedule back-to-back appointments and the doctors have regularly scheduled times for returning calls. There is a reason why the “cares of the world are rarely behind us”, YOU and your lousy system!

© James Berkeley 2018. All Rights Reserved.

Social Media: The Investors Perspective

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017



I get asked by investors about the role of social media in stimulating the profitable growth of mid-market business-to-consumer and business-to-business targets seeking growth capital. My default response is ‘why does someone want to share their video, tweet, blog? Then, how does it help them (entrepreneur) and you (investor) achieve your goals in the next 12 months?’ If you don’t have a compelling answer to that question, it is probably a waste of time and going to have zero impact on the firm’s growth. Review any YouTube, Twitter, Instagram or Facebook listing of most popular videos, tweets, images or blog posts and there is always that one thing that made people share it. That is the secret sauce. The son of one of my old bosses, Sam Tsui, an American songwriter, has had incredible success attracting 2.5 million subscribers to his YouTube channel. Sam is talented (Yale-educated). He possesses a great voice. He has learned to leverage the medium with great effect (singing duets with himself) in order to create a strong brand.

However, sharing alone is insufficient for Sam and the businesses I describe because there is no taste or noise filter, think of profane rants from soccer fans, product disasters and compromising personal photos, dressed up as “comedy” or black humour.

There needs to be a “gravity” pull for your target audience and a reason to keep returning. That requires volume, value and consistent messaging (“VVM”) to create engagement. Paid promotion works to raise “conscious” awareness of your product or service for a millisecond but it does little to stimulate someone to act (subscribe, make the call, visit the store, buy). So long as you put the marketing investment in the appropriate context, there is little to worry about but you must be willing to be intellectually honest about the results.

© James Berkeley 2017. All Rights Reserved.


Investor Accountability

Friday, December 16th, 2016

“What is the one action I have undertaken today to positively nurture our investment pipeline?”

If you want to continually stay on an upward investment curve, it comes down to simple things: individual accountability within an investment firm. Whether you are a HNW individual, a Family Office direct and co-investing, a private equity or venture capital fund manager or an adviser deploying your own and others money, it doesn’t matter.   Be intellectually honest and answer the question, before you leave your office.

© James Berkeley 2016. All Rights Reserved.


Producing and Rewarding Loyalty

Monday, November 2nd, 2015

I am always fascinated by the differences between “producing” and “rewarding” loyalty.

In a great many financial services businesses, particularly in post merger integration or when members of a leadership team walk out, there is a huge confusion between the two. You cannot motivate an individual to stay. Motivation comes from within the individual.

He or she makes a determination that their self-interest is best served by being loyal to their direct report and the firm’s strategic direction. In return for their contribution to the firm’s future health and well-being, the employee has expectations (pay, incentives, affiliation, career development and so on) that must be met or exceeded.

This is not Alcatraz. Legal “lock up” remedies that demand “compliance” are largely ineffectual.  Equally, peer pressure,  for example, midway through the sale process, “we are best served by sticking together”, only works where there is hard evidence or strong anecdotal information to support it (peer pressure).

To understand how you produce loyalty, turn the question upside down, “what would most likely cause the individual to walk away?” Write down a list of 10 probable reasons. Highlight the five most probable reasons. Delete the other four most probable reasons and work on the top reason. Once addressed, move on to addressing the next most probable reason.

Ask yourself, “what alternative exists or we could quickly create to meet this objective?” and then, “How easy is this to implement?” (timing, approval, flexibility)

Of course, your accuracy and probability of success is dramatically enhanced by having this conversation with each individual in-person on neutral territory.

If you think that by hiding from having the conversation you are safer, you are deluding yourself. Silence is not golden, it is merely a retreat into a higher risk and more obscure position.

The default position for many owners of newly acquired businesses or businesses responding to a mass departure of executives is to throw money at it. A belief that a one time retention bonus alone will “secure” the businesses prized assets (people, clients, intellectual property and so on). I am sorry that is crap. You are dealing with human behaviours.

Financial incentives in the form of carrots need to be frequent to impact human behaviour. One off payments do very little to engender loyalty other than to negatively impact the firm’s expense growth and cash resources. You are making disillusioned key employees richer but not more committed to the firm’s future.

Indeed, retention bonuses in isolation are often counter effective. People believe what they see happening not what they hear or read in the organisation.

You immediately create the “have’s” and the “have not’s” in the acquired or ongoing business (divisive behaviour). The “have not’s” lose trust and respect for the “have’s” (a belief, often correct, that their loyalty has been bought). You are encouraging leaders to protect THEIR nest egg (short-term thinking) ahead of furthering your interests (future growth and expansion).

Money alone is rarely the reason someone leaves a financial services business with the exception possibly of a heavily commission-orientated trader, broker or relationship manager. In 75% of cases I observe it is about the relationship with their direct boss. Therein lies the biggest clue to producing loyalty, develop great bosses who engender high levels of trust and respect from their subordinates (an honest-to-god belief that they will do the right thing for their subordinates).

In the acquiring company, make it a risk management priority in the due diligence phase to go through middle managers’ past performance in making smart people decisions and managing crises. Does the business have middle managers who command high, moderate or low levels of respect from key subordinates? Find the “glue” (answers) and you will be on the fast track to making smart decisions about securing the firm’s prized assets.

© James Berkeley 2015. All Rights Reserved.